Section 1 – General Information

I.   RULES AND PROCEDURES

The rules and procedures are to be used as the standard guideline throughout the Indian Youth Model United Nations Conferences. They are to be considered adopted prior to the beginning of the conference, and are only subject to change within a committee if the President gives notice a prior at the beginning of sessions.

II. CHAIRS

Committee chairs have the responsibility of running committee sessions, keeping track of attendance, and deciding on awards. All chair decisions are final and may only be appealed by a decision from the Executive Board. Vice President(s) are responsible for assisting the President in the above-mentioned responsibilities

III. GENERAL CONDUCT

Throughout the conference, all participants are expected to show courtesy and respect to all other participants, the chairs and student staff. If a delegate does not do so, he/she may be called to order by their chairs. If he/she repeatedly fails to do so, he/she may receive a warning, and that could possibly result in their suspension from committee as well as the loss of a participation certificate

IV. LANGUAGE

English shall be the official language of the committee sessions except Lok Sabha (which is Bilingual i.e. allows the use of Hindi as well). Delegates are encouraged to use English when committees are not in session.

Section 2 – Pre-Conference Preparation

VI. BACKGROUND RESEARCH

All delegates are required to have significant and extensive knowledge of their countries and topics. This means that delegates should have thorough knowledge about their country and their country’s position on their committee’s topics. Delegates should research historical background, past initiatives, relevant treaties, involved parties, current news regarding the topics, and most importantly, their country’s position, allies, and stance on the issue and related matters. Delegates can access the ‘Preparation Guide’ available on the IYMUN website as well.

VII. THOROUGH KNOWLEDGE OF PROVIDED BACKGROUND GUIDE

All delegates must read and have substantive knowledge of all information provided in the background guides of their topics. Background guides will be provided for each committee.

VIII. POSITION PAPER

Delegates will be required to submit position papers on their topic areas prior to the conference. General position paper requirements for IYMUN can be found on the ‘Position Paper’ page on the website and in the background guide as well, which will be made available for each committee. Please refer to the Position Paper guidelines listed for specific information. It needs to be uploaded to the committee’s email address as provided on the website. Please submit as a .doc or .pdf.

IX. OPENING SPEECH

Opening speeches will vary in each committee. The Committee President has the authority to suspend opening speeches, should he/she feel they are unnecessary. Yet, all delegates are should prepare and present Opening Speeches for each topic they are to debate. Opening Speeches can be based on the position papers that the delegates must submit, but they can also include what the delegates hope to accomplish in the conference. Opening speeches in committees with 25 delegates or less can be 1-2 minutes in length. Opening speeches in committees with more than 25 delegates should not be more than 1 minute.

Section 3 – Attendance

XI. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Delegates are expected to attend all official sessions, and are expected to be there on time. If delegates are repeatedly absent or late, respective MUN coordinators will be notified from the IYMUN in – charges. Schools with such delegates may be suspended from attending the conference in the future. Furthermore, delegates missing any session may not receive a participation certificate.

XII. ROLL CALL

Roll call will take place at the beginning of every session. During roll call, delegates will reply with either: present, present and voting, or present and observing. Present allows delegates to abstain from voting. Present and voting requires delegates to vote for or against the resolution. Present and observing requires that the delegates are not voting (this is for delegates with observer status).

XIII.   PARTICIPATION CERTIFICATE IS CONDITIONAL

All delegates receive certificates of participation at the end of the conference. However, receiving the participation certificate is conditional upon attendance and behaviour. Delegates missing any session may not receive a participation certificate. The chair, however, in consultation with the conference organizer, reserves the final word on the matter (depending on the delegate’s overall participation).

Section 4 – Procedures for Debate

XIV. VOTE ON AGENDA

The first order of business for each Committee will be the consideration of the agenda. A motion should be made to put a topic first on the agenda. This motion requires a second (Supporters).

XV. SPEAKER’S LIST

The chairs will open up a speaker’s list once the agenda is set. The speaker’s list is meant to start off the debate, and thus allows for any delegate wishing to introduce a certain point or aspect of the topic to put his/her name on the speaker’s list. In a way, the speaker’s list is an extension of the opening speeches as it allows delegates to get into more detail regarding matters they find to be important.

XVI. MOTION FOR CAUCUS (MODERATED OR UN-MODERATED)

Once delegates have an understanding of what issues are important to other delegates, they can begin to debate more specific matters concerning their topics, by motioning for a caucus. A motion for a caucus must specify if the caucus will be moderated or un-moderated and the length of the caucus (in minutes). In case of a crisis, delegates can motion for a caucus to discuss the new topic.

a.        Motion for a Moderated Caucus

A moderated caucus is formal debate over a specific matter to be moderated by the chairs. The chair will call on delegates to take the floor and speak. The chair can also ask the delegates if they are open to any points of information (or questions). Once the delegate who has the floor specifies how many points of information he/she is open to (if any), the chair selects delegates wishing to ask a point of information.

Delegates motioning for a moderated caucus must specify the reason for the caucus, the structure of the caucus (time for/against, and/or open debate), as well as the individual speaking time for each speaker. Moderated caucuses may be used to debate clauses in working papers.

b.   Motion for an Un-moderated Caucus

Un-moderated caucuses are a temporary recession from formal debate, allowing the delegates to informally meet. Unmoderated caucuses are useful in allowing delegates to interact and merge for resolutions or begin on a working paper, or lobbying for resolutions and getting enough signatories.

XVII. WORKING PAPERS

A working paper is a clause or group of clauses that has not been submitted as a draft resolution yet. Moderated caucuses may be used to debate working papers before they are submitted as draft resolutions.

XVIII. SUBMITTING A DRAFT RESOLUTION

A draft resolution is a completed resolution that is to be handed in to the chairs, and debated as a whole resolution before being voted upon. In order for a draft resolution to be submitted to the chair, it must satisfy the following requirements:

a. The resolution must have perambulatory and operative clauses

i. Perambulatory clauses set the foundations for the resolution’s argument. They serve to cite historical facts, precedents, and statements about the purpose of action. In other words, they help explain why the committee is addressing this topic. All perambulatory clauses should begin with a present participle and end with a comma.

ii. Operative clauses are the policies that the resolution is designated to create. They are used to explain what the committee will do to address the issue. Operative clauses being with a verb (which is called an operative phrase) and end with a semicolon. Unlike perambulatory clauses, operative clauses must be numbered and must follow some logical or chronological order. The last clause ends with a period, signifying the end of the resolution.

iii. Please refer to the attached list of perambulatory and operative phrases on the ‘Resolutions’ page on the IYMUN website.

b. Sponsors and Authors: There must be one main submitter, and 2 – 3 co-submitters as wanted. All submitters (main and co) are later required to vote for the resolution.

c. Signatories are delegates who sign on that they wish to debate the resolution; however by signing on to a resolution they are not committing to voting for it. In committees with 15 delegates or less, signatories are not required. In committees with 25-51 people, draft resolutions must have 10 signatories. In committees with 52-60 delegates, draft resolutions must have 18 signatories. The President reserves the right to intervene according to the situation in the committee.

XIX.   CLOSURE OF DEBATE

When the floor is open, a delegate may move to closure of debate. Closure of debate requires the support of two-thirds of the members. If the Committee is in favour of closure, the Chair will declare the closure of the debate, and the resolution or amendment will be brought to an immediate vote.

XX.      RECONSIDERATION

A motion to reconsider is in order when a resolution or amendment has been adopted or rejected, and must be made by a member who voted with the majority on the substantive proposal. Two-thirds majority is required for reconsideration.

Section 5 – Debating a Draft Resolution

XXI.   TIME ALLOTMENTS FOR DEBATE OF DRAFT RESOLUTIONS

Debate of Draft Resolutions is in the format of OPEN Debate. Once a draft resolution is submitted, the chair will designate X number of minutes of debate time FOR the resolution, X number of minutes of debate AGAINST the resolution, and Y number of minutes of open debate for the resolution as a whole. During time for, only delegates for the resolution can speak. During time against, only delegates against the resolution can speak. During open debate, any delegate can speak.

In committees where substantive time has been spent debating the working paper and voting on individual clauses, debate on the draft resolution might be much shorter than in committees where delegates came prepared with working papers ready for submission as draft resolutions. The length of time spent on each aspect of the debate is flexible and depends on the delegates’ initiative and preparation.

XXII. SPEECHES

During each time allotment (for, against, and open debate), the chair will select the speakers who will give speeches for or against the resolution. At the beginning of the debate, the chair will specify the length of these speeches. At the end of these speeches, the chair will ask the speaker if he/she is open to any points of information.

XXIII. YIELDS

When a speaker is done, and has answered any points of information, the chair might ask him/her to yield the floor back to the chair if his/her time is up, or might give him/her the option to yield it to another delegate if he/she still has floor time.

By yielding the floor to another delegate, the other delegate would have any remaining time that the first speaker did not use up. Only one yield is permitted. The Chairs, however, have the authority to overrule yielding procedures.

Section 6 – Points of Debate

XXIV. POINT OF PERSONAL PRIVILEGE

A point of personal privilege is directed to the chair and is the only point that may interrupt a speaker, this point asks whoever has the floor to either raise his/her volume or clarify his/her speech.

XXV. POINT OF ORDER

A point of order is directed to the chair and inquires if a certain speech or action was in order and compliance with the session’s rules and regulations. This point may not interrupt the speaker.

XXVI. POINT OF PARLIAMENTARY INQUIRY

A point of parliamentary inquiry is directed to the chair and inquires about the procedures of the session and the debate. This point may not interrupt the speaker.

XXVII.     POINT OF INFORMATION

A point of information is directed to a delegate who has the floor and serves to ask a question about the content of his/her speech or his/her position on a certain issue or topic. A point of information must be phrased as a question, or else it is out of order. This point may not interrupt the speaker.

XXVIII.    RIGHT TO REPLY

A delegate whose personal or national integrity has been egregiously impugned by another delegate may request a Right of Reply. The Chair’s decision whether to grant the Right of Reply may not be appealed, and a delegate granted a Right of Reply will not address the committee except at the request of the Chair.

Section 7 – Motions of Debate

XXIX. MOTION

A motion is any proposal made by any delegate. For a motion to pass, there must be a second, and there must be no objections. If there is an objection, a motion will be voted upon.

XXX. MOTION PRECEDENCE

When there are several motions on the floor, the motion that takes precedence is the one that should be first entertained. Motion for an unmoderated caucus takes precedence over a motion for a moderated caucus. If there are two motions for a caucus of the same time length, the one for the longest time or the longest speaker’s time takes precedence. In general, motions that serve to further the debate take precedence, and are to be entertained at the discretion of the chair. The Chair can overrule, however.

XXXI. MOTION FOR A MODERATED CAUCUS

As mentioned above.

XXXII.     MOTION FOR AN UNMODERATED CAUCUS

As mentioned above

XXXIII.   MOTION TO EXTEND DEBATE

This motion can refer to extending a moderated caucus, an unmoderated caucus, or time in open debate for a resolution.

XXXIV. MOTION TO MOVE INTO TIME AGAINST, TIME IN OPEN DEBATE, OR VOTING PROCEDURE

  1. When debating a resolution in time for and no one is willing to speak for, delegates can motion to move into time against.
  2. When debating a resolution in time against and no one is willing to speak against, delegates can motion to move into time for open debate, or they can motion to move into voting procedure.
  3. When debating a resolution in open debate and no one is willing to speak, delegates can motion to move into voting procedure.
  4. These motions hold for debating individual clauses of a working paper, the draft resolution, or amendments.

XXXV. MOTION TO CLOSE DEBATE

When debating in a caucus, where the topic is exhausted before due time, delegates can motion to close debate.

XXXVI. MOTION TO TABLE A TOPIC

Delegates are allowed to table a topic and return to it later. By tabling a topic, delegates put it on hold, move on to another topic, and may later come back to it. This motion is used in cases such as a crisis, where delegates must deal with the crisis immediately rather than the topic at hand.

XXXVII. MOTION TO REINTRODUCE A TOPIC

After a crisis has been dealt with, delegates can motion to reintroduce the previously debated topic.

XXXVIII. MOTION TO INTRODUCE A RESOLUTION

Once a working paper fulfills all the requirements listed in section 4, article XIX, the main submitter must motion to introduce a resolution. Once this happens, debate time for the resolution begins.

XXXIX.    MOTION TO ADJOURN THE MEETING

If debate has been exhausted, delegates may motion to adjourn the meeting

Section 8 – Amendments

Delegates may amend any resolution that has been introduced. Acceptable amendments may add and/ or strike words, phrases or full clauses to the operative clauses of a resolution. Perambulatory clauses cannot be changed in any way (except to correct spelling, punctuation or grammar) following formal submission of the resolution to the floor of the committee. Corrections in spelling, punctuation, or grammar in the operative clauses are made automatically as they are brought to the attention of the dais, and do not need to be submitted as official amendments. All amendments must be presented to the dais and approved prior to the onset of voting procedure. The Chair will read the amendment to the committee before a vote.

Amendments to amendments are out in order. In addition, an amended part of a resolution may be further amended. Amendments shall be submitted by passing a note to the chair.

I.                   An approved amendment may be introduced when the floor is open.

II.                General Debate will be suspended and a Speakers List will be established for and against an unfriendly amendment.

III.             A motion to close debate will be in order after the Committee has heard two speakers for the unfriendly amendment and two against, or all the speakers on one side and at least two on the other side. Following the normal procedure, the Chair will recognize two speakers against the motion to close debate, and a vote of two-thirds majority is required for closure.

IV. When debate is closed on the unfriendly amendment, the Committee will move to an immediate vote. A simple majority is required to pass an unfriendly amendment. After the vote, debate will resume according to the General Speakers List.

XL. EDITORIAL OR FRIENDLY AMENDMENTS

Editorial amendments do not alter the meaning, intent, effect, or overall substance of a draft resolution. These amendments tend to be grammatical in nature or follow a consensus. Such amendments are automatically passed if there are no objections.

XLI.    UNFRIENDLY AMENDMENT

An unfriendly amendment is an amendment that alters the meaning, intent, effect, or overall substance of a draft resolution. The submitter of the amendment may present and speak for the amendment. The chair then designates time to debate the amendment. Once time debating the amendment elapses, a voting procedure takes place. For the amendment to pass, it requires a two-thirds majority. Voting for amendments is considered a procedural vote and therefore no abstentions are allowed.

Section 9 – Procedures and Motions for Voting on Resolutions

XLII. VOTING PROCEDURE

Final resolutions must be passed by a simple majority vote. The chair will first ask for all delegates wishing to vote for the resolution to raise their placards, then for all delegates wishing to vote against the resolution to raise their placards, and finally all delegates wishing to abstain to raise their placards. If any delegate believes there was an error in counting votes, they can motion for a roll call vote (refer to article XXXIV, sub-article c).

In some committees, a consensus is the preferred method of passing resolutions. However, if reaching a consensus fails in these committees, a simple majority will be sufficient for the purposes of the conference.

XLIII. VOTING MOTIONS

a.        Motion to Move into Voting Procedure

Once debate over a draft resolution is exhausted, any delegate may motion to move into voting procedure.

b.       Motion to Divide the House

If there is a tie, a motion to divide the house would require for there to be a re-vote with no abstentions. All delegates must vote either for or against the resolution.

c.        Motion for the Division of the Question

If a resolution fails, a motion for the division of the question requires for each clause to be voted upon independently, allowing for the possible elimination of the clauses that fail, and a re-vote on the final revised resolution.

d.       Motion for a Roll Call Vote

A roll call vote requires that the chair count votes by asking each delegate, in alphabetical order, to say their vote out loud. This is useful in case there is suspicion of error in counting votes or there is suspicion that an ally or a co-submitter voted against a resolution.

XLIV. DIVISION OF THE QUESTION

After debate on any resolution or amendment has been closed, a delegate may move that operative parts of the proposal be voted on separately. Preambulatory clauses and sub-operative clauses may not be removed by division of the question. Delegates should keep in mind that the final document will be put to a substantive vote as a whole requiring a simple majority to pass. If no division passes, the resolution remains intact.

a. The Chair will, at that point, take any further motions to divide the question and then arrange them from most severe to least so that the motion splitting the resolution into the greatest number of operative parts is voted on first.

b. If an objection is made to a motion to divide the question, that motion will be debated to the extent of two speakers for and two against, to be followed by an immediate procedural vote on that motion.

c. If the motion receives the simple majority required to pass, the resolution or amendment will be divided accordingly, and a separate procedural vote will be taken on each divided part to determine whether or not it is included in the final draft.

e.        Parts of the resolution or amendment which are subsequently passed will be recombined into a final document and will be put to a substantive vote as a whole, requiring a simple majority to pass. If all of the operative parts of the substantive proposal are rejected, the proposal will be considered to have been rejected as a whole.